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By on Jun 15, 2012 at 9:16 am, in News, TESO  |  Comments: No comments yet

Another review from E3, this time from the Escapist, talking about their opinion on what they saw of The Elder Scrolls at E3.

Despite the MMO nature of the game, your own personal story missions will be entirely instanced. You can share the rest of the game with other players, but when it comes time to advance the story of reclaiming your soul from the Daedric prince who stole it, you’re all on your own. This should allow Bethesda to tell a much more personally relevant story. The rest of the time, you’ll be involved in group instances, public quests, and raids. To combat kill stealing and spawn camping, everyone who participates in a given encounter is rewarded for it, so even if you’re late to the party, so to speak, you can still get credit for killing mobs and looting quest items.

The quest we saw was particularly involved. Geared for slightly more experienced characters, this mission focused on liberating the town of Camlorn from the werewolf Faolchu and his rampaging army. The problem is no one knows how to kill this particular werewolf. As the player travels the Glenumbra Moors, he or she comes across the site of an ancient battle. After looting the field for magic weapons, the characters recruit an alchemist to open a rift in time and allow them to travel back to the original battle where they discover Faolchu himself in his pre-wolf form. I won’t spoil the outcome of the story here, but the players learn something about Faolchu in this sequence that will help them in their eventual showdown with the werewolf version.

To read the full accounting hit up the Escapist.

By on Jun 9, 2012 at 9:00 am, in News  |  Comments: No comments yet

The Escapist brings us their own opinion of Defiance from E3. This time the author gives us a his brief opinion on the dynamic system in the game, and this time the author was playing on a console rather than a PC.

While I was waiting for one of the developers during my demo, I picked up a controller and started playing. It only took a few seconds to figure out what I was supposed to do. Even though it’s an MMO, it’s completely intuitive to anyone who’s played a third-person shooter before, and it was nice to not need a bunch of instructions before I could proceed. I saw a marker on my map in the distance, hopped on an ATV, and made my way over to a massive fight between humans and Hellbugs, the nightmarish creatures that are the result of decades of war between Earthlings and aliens. I jumped into the action, helping my fellow humans take out the bugs and picking up some loot along the way.

At that point I was joined by a developer, who pointed out the ease with which I had gotten into the game. “That’s exactly what we were going for,” he told me. I was in the midst of an event that had changed a bright, sunny day to a gloomy one, and I went from objective to objective fighting bugs until the final challenge, an enormous creature that required teamwork and patience to take down. Throughout the entire demo, I never stopped having fun.

What’s cool is that while events like these will happen within the world of Defiance, participation in them is optional. Players can continue on other quests, and when the skies darken and the Hellbugs appear they can answer the call or ignore it entirely. This is similar to Trion’s MMO Rift, and seems to be working really well in that game, so it’s great to see that interesting element used in another game.

Read the rest of the article over at The Escapist.

By on May 7, 2012 at 4:41 pm, in GW2, News  |  Comments: No comments yet

Check out The Escapist’s preview of Guild Wars 2. The talk about the in and outs of the game and what makes in unique!

Overall the combat in Guild Wars 2 has a great feeling of mobility and there’s much less emphasis on predefined class roles. Like its predecessor, Guild Wars 2 focuses on a much tighter grouping of skills as you’ll only ever have 10 skills at a time and one or more specific profession-based abilities. The thief, for instance, can steal temporary items to be used against foes whereas the elementalist can change their elemental attunement, which effects what their spells do. Your first five skills are determined by your currently equipped weapon, but you’re given more freedom to pick your healing, elite and utility skills in the later five.

Read the rest of the article from the link below.

Source: Guild Wars 2 Preview

By on Oct 20, 2011 at 2:11 pm, in SWTOR, Uncategorized  |  Comments: No comments yet

The Escapist Beta Impressions for SWTOR

The lifted media embargo continues, as we get more impressions from around the internet. This time we can find the impressions of another media tester from The Escapist. This article reads like a full blown preview of the game, covering all aspects of the game from story to game mechanics.

Thankfully, the combat is true to the overall style of Star Wars. Jedis leap into combat, swinging their lightsabers left and right as flesh-eating aliens fall around them, or how Smugglers crouch behind cover, using thermal grenades and blasters to take out robot sentries and bounty hunters. I have to say though, having started with a Jedi class, the smuggler and trooper are just not as dynamic. Sure, the cover system and ranged combat work as designed, but I didn’t feel that the combat for the ranged classes was as active or strategic as the combat for the Jedis. Once you find a spot of cover, you just start cycling through your attacks until it’s time to move on to the next bit of cover. Sure, as a Jedi you’re equally focused on hotbars and cooldowns, but at least you get to move around a bit and watch some exciting animations.

Out of all the goodies in this article, we do find out that the main pull for the author is that his Smuggler got to kick guys in the nuts!

By on Oct 20, 2011 at 2:11 pm, in SWTOR, Uncategorized  |  Comments: No comments yet

The Escapist Beta Impressions for SWTOR

The lifted media embargo continues, as we get more impressions from around the internet. This time we can find the impressions of another media tester from The Escapist. This article reads like a full blown preview of the game, covering all aspects of the game from story to game mechanics.

Thankfully, the combat is true to the overall style of Star Wars. Jedis leap into combat, swinging their lightsabers left and right as flesh-eating aliens fall around them, or how Smugglers crouch behind cover, using thermal grenades and blasters to take out robot sentries and bounty hunters. I have to say though, having started with a Jedi class, the smuggler and trooper are just not as dynamic. Sure, the cover system and ranged combat work as designed, but I didn’t feel that the combat for the ranged classes was as active or strategic as the combat for the Jedis. Once you find a spot of cover, you just start cycling through your attacks until it’s time to move on to the next bit of cover. Sure, as a Jedi you’re equally focused on hotbars and cooldowns, but at least you get to move around a bit and watch some exciting animations.

Out of all the goodies in this article, we do find out that the main pull for the author is that his Smuggler got to kick guys in the nuts!

By on Oct 20, 2011 at 2:11 pm, in SWTOR, Uncategorized  |  Comments: No comments yet

The Escapist Beta Impressions for SWTOR

The lifted media embargo continues, as we get more impressions from around the internet. This time we can find the impressions of another media tester from The Escapist. This article reads like a full blown preview of the game, covering all aspects of the game from story to game mechanics.

Thankfully, the combat is true to the overall style of Star Wars. Jedis leap into combat, swinging their lightsabers left and right as flesh-eating aliens fall around them, or how Smugglers crouch behind cover, using thermal grenades and blasters to take out robot sentries and bounty hunters. I have to say though, having started with a Jedi class, the smuggler and trooper are just not as dynamic. Sure, the cover system and ranged combat work as designed, but I didn’t feel that the combat for the ranged classes was as active or strategic as the combat for the Jedis. Once you find a spot of cover, you just start cycling through your attacks until it’s time to move on to the next bit of cover. Sure, as a Jedi you’re equally focused on hotbars and cooldowns, but at least you get to move around a bit and watch some exciting animations.

Out of all the goodies in this article, we do find out that the main pull for the author is that his Smuggler got to kick guys in the nuts!

By on Aug 24, 2010 at 1:14 pm, in News, RIFT  |  Comments: No comments yet

More GamesCom information coming out for Rift: Planes of Telara, now from the mass media sites; this time from The Escapist. It’s a quick over view of what we know of invasions and the instance Realm of the Fae.

In our short time with Rift, we were only briefly shown what happens when planar rifts run wild, but it was more than enough to spark interest. Eventually, the elemental forces will start wandering away from the area immediately around the rift, interacting with – and wreaking havoc on – the world at large. They’ll even attack quest hubs and kill quest givers if not stopped. Of course, players will get quests to drive them back in return … but the longer the rift is open, the more powerful they’ll become, requiring more of a concerted effort on the part of players to stop the invasion.

Make sure you read whole whole hands on impression.

By on Aug 10, 2010 at 10:43 pm, in News, RIFT  |  Comments: No comments yet

If you’re starved for people’s observations after getting their hands on Rift: Planes of Telara, then you might want to take a quick look at The Escapist. The author, John Funk, got the chance to play a Night Blade while wandering around the Shadowlands.

After playing it for a few hours last week, I can say that my initial observations were right on the money. It’s immediately accessible for anyone who has spent a good amount of time in World of Warcraft or any other modern MMOG. I didn’t know a thing about the Nightblade character I created – one of Rift’s Rogue subclasses – but found it easy to grok the concept right away.

Read the rest of the hands on review and find out more about John’s adventure closing a Death Rift.

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